Wednesday, 5 October 2016

IWSG: Ending that Story


Welcome to another Insecure Writer's Support Group hosted by Alex Cavanaugh, co-hosts and his team of lovely helpers. 

IWSG Monthly Question: When do you know your story is ready?

That answer is different for everyone. For me it depends on the book, story or work. There just comes a point when everything that needs to be done is finished. At that point you have to decide whether you will stop nitpicking your work to death and move unto the submission or publishing process. You have to decide to stop. Sure there might be other avenues that could be explored. But is it relevant to the book or the potential readers? If it is not then it's your own selfish desire to never part with this creation you have made. If you want to keep a story for yourself to tweak around with then fine. However that piece of work is not suitable for serious publishing. 

So at the end of the day the answer is different for each person. If you want to be a serious writer you have to put what your book needs ahead of a lot of things you might want that is not relevant to the story. This goes for all types of writing. Do you know when to end your story? Thanks for coming and God Bless.

34 comments:

  1. "Is it relevant to the book or potential readers?" What an excellent and important question for a writer to consider when evaluating his or her writing, Sheena-Kay! It would be brutal to be called out for self-indulgence! Thanks for highlighting this!

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    1. You're welcome. I checked out your blog and really liked your post.

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  2. in other news, methinks most of the popular YA writers should've worked on their works a year longer before sending them to their publishers :) But as someone who works in publishing, I'd say that is more a problem of bad editors these days who don't know how to enhance the work of writers and help them perfect their books

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    1. Agreed Dez. Sadly I think segments of publishing have become more interested in getting books out there than putting out quality work.

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  3. Nitpicking is the key word. That's usually what it comes down too.
    Hope all is well after the hurricane!

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    1. Yes it mostly passed us in Jamaica. Haiti was not so lucky. Keep them in your prayers and thanks for coming.

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  4. Sometimes I can get too nitpicking because I love editing more than the blank page. Yes, it's different for everyone.

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  5. As writers, we keep growing and changing, which means we keep wanting to make things better. Which leads to lots of tinkering.

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  6. I agree, you have to reach that point where enough is enough and let it go.

    Betty

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  7. Putting what your book needs ahead of what you might want is a great way to put it! Hard to do sometimes but definitely the right call.

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  8. I've heard a lot of writers say they know a manuscript is done when they can't look at it anymore. That's usually a sign that you've gone through it a lot!

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    1. That sign kind of scares me. They better make sure it's not a quality issue first then go forward. Wished a certain author of a book I gave two stars recently did that.

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  9. We really do have to stop nitpicking our stories. I know when I start doing that I'm officially and finally done with it.

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  10. I think we all have different methods. Enjoyed reading your post. Thank you for sharing, Sheena. Have a super month.

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  11. Excellent post. Reminds me of some sage advice from a successful author- don't fall in love with your own story and meander about in it. Write for the reader's pleasure not yours.
    Blessing to you too! I've been thinking of you and praying for you with this hurricane swirling around.

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  12. Funny. How to end a story has been the topic of many of my internet searches lately. I truly hate to disappoint. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  13. Yes, you are so right. When it's done, it's done. I keep telling myself that. :) Great post.

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  14. It is a question that's difficult to pin down because it varies so much on the writer, the project, the moment.

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  15. Book babies are hard to let go, but once you've been over it so many times, you have to send it out into the world. You can over edit too!

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  16. I agree that nitpicking is a big issue. It is the death of creativity, a sin of which I am tend to be guilty. Knowing that each project has its own needs with respect to revision.

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  17. I know I over edit, but at one time, we do have to just let them go. Each person is different and each MS is different. So I don't think there's a real answer to the question.

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  18. I know I over edit, but at one time, we do have to just let them go. Each person is different and each MS is different. So I don't think there's a real answer to the question.

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  19. I like your question. I'm always thinking of how I could go in completely different directions with a manuscript, but at some point you do have to stop. If you've told the story you wanted to tell in the best way you could, then it's done.

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  20. I hear you. There are some people who are just ready to be done, so they call it done and throw it out there. Not a happy thing. Each book has its specific demands and requirements, and if you can't meet them, it needs to sit on the shelf a little longer.

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  21. I like "you have to decide to stop." Excellent advice.

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  22. Very powerful message. Picking that moment to stop may be heard, but it must be done if the intention is to be a serious writer.

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  23. So far, my desire to get on to other projects outweighs my desire to tinker with a book forever. But not by much! lol

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  24. The way I see it is that it's good to aim for perfection, but if you expect to ever reach it then your book will never be finished. You've got to move on someday if you want to get things done.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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  25. I agree with you on knowing when a story is finished. Sometimes you just got to step away.

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  26. Stepping away and coming back to a piece definitely helps. Sometimes we could go on and on making changes, so there does come a point when you just have to say I have done my best. :) Great post!
    ~Jess

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